The Blizzard of 1888

With Litchfield stuck in a weather pattern that seems to bring more snow every day, perhaps a look back at the great Blizzard of 1888 is in order.

Drifted snow at Dr. Buel's house on North Street, Litchfield, 1888.  Courtesy of Litchfield Historical Society.

Drifted snow at Dr. Buel’s house on North Street, Litchfield, 1888. Courtesy of Litchfield Historical Society.

With little in the way of accurate meteorological predictions, the blizzard came as a surprise to the Northeast on Sunday, March 11, 1888.  It had been an unusually warm winter, and that day dawned with rain.  It soon turned to hail, then sleet, then ultimately snow.  Bitter cold and high winds set in, and the snow continued for three days.  When it all stopped, between 20 and 50 inches of snow had fallen in Connecticut, with drifts of 12 feet not uncommon.  (One drift in New Haven reached 40 feet high!)  The storm resulted in more than 400 deaths and an estimated $20 million worth of damage.

Dr. Buel's house after the snow had melted.  One source says the snow was melted within ten days; another says the last of the drifts didn't melt until June! Courtesy of Litchfield Historical Society.

Dr. Buel’s house after the snow had melted. One source says the snow was melted within ten days; another says the last of the drifts didn’t melt until June! Courtesy of Litchfield Historical Society.

The following are excerpts about the blizzard from the Litchfield Enquirer:

March 12th – “The wind blew a perfect blizzard all day and the drifting and falling snow made even main streets almost impassable Monday night the storm continued with increasing fury and buildings rocked as though in a storm at sea.”

A modern view of Dr. Buel's house.

A modern view of Dr. Buel’s house.

March 13th – “On Tuesday morning the wind had lessened though still blowing a gale with the thermometer at or near zero. The most remarkable drifts are at Dr. [H. W.] Buel‘s. One, a little west of the house, about 20 feet, to a level with the eaves. There is an addition on the west of Dr. Buel‘s house, reaching- about to the eaves, which is almost completely covered by the snow, so that our reporter, walking- along the top of the drift, passed completely over the roof of this part of the house, and down on the northern side. There is a drift on the east which is even higher, shutting up one of the library windows completely, and reaching nearly to the top of one of the large firs which form a hedge on that side of the house.

March 14th – “The wind is northeast and considerable snow is still falling. People are about on snow shoes skees (sic) and snow shoes extemporized out of boards some carrying groceries to those in great want. Little business is doing. Most of the stores are closed. A few are open with people standing about comparing notes about tunneling to their woodsheds drifts over second story windows and other marvels of the great storm.”

The Lake Station, Bantam.  Courtesy of White Memorial Foundation.

The Lake Station, Bantam. Courtesy of White Memorial Foundation.

The Shepaug Railroad was out of service until March 16th. A railroad cut near the Lake Station (today the Cove in Bantam) was filled with a drift 22 feet deep!

And all this snow needed to be removed from the transportation network without the benefit of modern plows!

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3 thoughts on “The Blizzard of 1888

  1. I grew up in Litchfield (LHS 1990) and my parents still live in the same house on Goshen Rd that they moved into in 1971 so I’m back and forth quite a bit. I live in NH so I usually take 118 to Rt.4 to 84 and have always wondered about that abandon train car in East Litchfield on the south side of 118 just before you cross Rt. 8. Do you have any information about it?

    Related I’ve always wondered where ‘exactly’ the northern terminus of the Naugatuck Railroad is in town. I seem to recall someone telling me once it’s near the bottom of West St.hill.

    Thanks!

  2. I grew up in Litchfield (LHS 1990) and my parents still live in the same house on Goshen Rd that they moved into in 1971 so I’m back and forth quite a bit. I live in NH so I usually take 118 to Rt.4 to 84 and have always wondered about that abandon train car in East Litchfield on the south side of 118 just before you cross Rt. 8. Do you have any information about it?

    Related I’ve always wondered where ‘exactly’ the northern terminus of the Naugatuck Railroad is in town. I seem to recall someone telling me once it’s near the bottom of West St.hill.

    Thanks!

    • Hello! Thanks for reading. The abandoned rail car in East Litchfield is in the area of the old East Litchfield train station on the Naugatuck Valley Railroad line, which was built in 1849. The Shepaug Railroad had its terminus on Russell Street, at the bottom of West Street hill, in what is today the Litchfield Historic District Commission office.

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